CFP: Popular Culture Assn./American Culture Assn. Annual Conference

Popular Culture Association & American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

Fashion, Style, Appearance, Consumption & Design

April 1 – 4, 2015 National Conference – New Orleans, LA 

Fashion, Style, Appearance, Consumption & Design is concerned with all areas and aspects of style, fashion, clothing, design, and related trends, as well as appearances and consumption using and/or including

  • historical sources
  • manufacturing,
  • aesthetics
  • marketing
  • branding
  • merchandising
  • retailing
  • psychological/ sociological aspects of dress
  • body image
  • cultural identities
  • any areas relating to purchasing, shopping, and the methods consumers construct identity.

 The deadline for online abstract proposal of papers will be November 1, 2014.

Submissions can only be submitted via the site http://ncp.pcaaca.org/. Select a Subject Area, enter your proposal’s title and input a clearly defined abstract of your scholarship of no more than 250 words and a short 50-word bio (please review in the database your name, university, abstract title and abstract for spelling & grammar). Submit only one proposal to one area.

Papers from all methods and disciplines are welcome! Innovative and new research, scholarship and creative works in the areas of fashion, design, the body and consumerism are encouraged!

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CFP: The Costume Society Symposium

The Costume Society Symposium in London
Friday 3 – Sunday 5 July 2015

This symposium theme is The Power of Gold. This is intentionally wide-ranging and offers many possibilities for papers which could focus on any aspect, period or geographical area in relation to dress and appearance. Papers are welcomed which interpret the theme imaginatively through different approaches and issues, drawing on interdisciplinary research based on garments and accessories, jewellery, photography, film, literature, and archives.

Subjects could fall within the following headings:

•The power of the use of gold in fashion and dress – issues of status, symbolism and cultural meanings, ranging for instance from fashion for beach and sunbathing to the power of golden jewellery

•Fashion’s fascination with gold – couture from its 19th century origins to the 21st century

•The power of gold in ceremonial and religious dress – the use of gold fabrics and embroidery in court dress in Europe or Asia, or ecclesiastical vestments from Opus Anglicanum to the present day

•Gold in fancy dress, theatre and film costume

•Golden fabrics – manufacturing techniques, design, status and consumption, such as 18th century silks to gold and metallic fabrics in the 1920s and 1930s

Papers are welcome from academics, collectors, curators, designers, research students, and independent scholars. Papers, with the exception of those by keynote speakers will be of 30 minutes duration with illustrations by PowerPoint.

Deadline: Those wishing to offer papers should submit an abstract of about 200 words with a short CV by 23rd October 2014 in WORD (no formatting). All submissions will receive replies by January 2015.

Abstracts and CVs should be sent to symposium@costumesociety.org.uk

Submissions will be considered by a committee from the Costume Society Executive Committee.

The Society regrets that it is not possible to pay for expenses in the preparation and presentation of a paper, or for travel to the Symposium.

The Society offers a bursary for a student to attend the Symposium – details can be found on our website costumesociety.org.uk

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CFP: The Sixties – The Culture, the Movements, and the Summer of Love

Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual National Conference: The Sixties: The Culture, the Movements, and the Summer of Love

Wednesday, April 1 through Saturday, April 4, 2015

New Orleans, Louisiana

The Sixties Area of the Popular Culture Association welcomes submissions on any aspect of popular culture from this era. Topics of interest might include, but are not limited to:

  • Film, television, and radio of the era
  • Analysis of influential books/authors and/or arts/artists  e.g. Ginsberg; Warhol
  • Religion and spirituality
  • Sex, drugs, and rock ‘n roll
  • Music and fashion as cultural expression and consumer culture
  • Communal living
  • 1969, or other significant dates, places, or events, e.g. Days of Rage, etc.
  • Countercultural movements—Hippies, SDS, Black Panther Party, the White Panther Party, etc.
  • Politics and protests of the era e.g. Civil Rights, Vietnam
  • Race and gender issues e.g. the 1968 Olympic Project for Human Rights, NOW
  • Media reaction and representation

Deadline for submission of a 100-250-word abstract is November 1, 2014.

Please email Deborah Carmichael at Michigan State University with abstracts, inquiries, or proposals.

Please see the announcement for full details.

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CFP: AMA/ACRA SECOND TRIENNIAL CONFERENCE

AMA/ACRA Second Triennial Conference

March 4 – 7, 2015

Miami, Florida

The American Marketing Association (AMA) and American Collegiate Retailing Association (ACRA) invite submissions for their second triennial conference to be held in Coral Gables, Florida. Extended abstracts, competitive papers, workshop proposals, and doctoral paper submissions are all invited. Possible topics include:

  • Branding
  • Consumer psychology
  • Global retailing
  • Sustainability
  • Social Media

Submission deadline: September 30, 2014.

Please see conference website for full details.

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CFP: The Look of Austerity Conference

The Look of Austerity

September 11-12, 2015

Museum of London

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, the beginning of a period of economic austerity for many affected nations. ‘Austerity’ is a term that has recently re-emerged in areas as disparate as politics and design, and is used to describe everything from specific policy decisions to the national mood. In light of this, The Look of Austerity aims to re-examine the post-war period, looking at the changing meaning and the face of austerity and exploring the real implications of austerity policies and culture on sartorial aesthetics. Focusing on the immediate post-war period, specifically the years 1945-1951, we invite papers that examine the popular experience of obtaining and wearing clothes throughout the western world during these turbulent and changing times, exploring the often overlooked areas of ready-to-wear innovation, international dialogues, and approaches that look beyond some of the popular myths of post-war fashion.

Topics for discussion may include:

  • fashion consumption and austerity, particularly popular and everyday experiences of obtaining and wearing clothes
  • the production and distribution of ready-to-wear
  • the role of couture after the war
  • dialogues across Western nations and fashion capitals, particularly Paris, New York, Berlin and Rome
  • visual and written representations of fashion in newspapers, magazines, advertisements, cinema and amateur film
  • biographic approaches, for example diaries, novels and short stories
  • the designer in a culture of austerity
  • the connection between austerity and glamour
  • re-emergence of the austerity look in later periods, for example in the 1970s/1990s
  • the legacy of the look of austerity

Proposals

If you wish to present a paper, please submit the following to austerity@museumoflondon.org.uk:
  • 500 word abstract of the proposed paper naming the presenter(s)
  • contact information: name, title, position, university or institutional affiliation, postal
  • address, email and telephone
  • 150-200 word biography of the presenter(s)

Deadline for submission of proposals: Monday 27 October 2014. Notification will be made to all by the end of November 2014. 

For more information, please visit the conference website.

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CFP: Lost Museums Colloquium

Lost Museums Colloquium

May 7 and 8, 2015

Brown University, Providence, RI

In conjunction with the year-long exhibition project examining Brown University’s lost Jenks Museum, the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, and the John Carter Brown Library invite paper proposals for a colloquium on lost artifacts, collections and museums. (Other formats—conceptual, poetic, and artistic—are also invited.) 

Museums, perhaps more than any other institutions, think in the very long term: collections are forever. But the history of museums is more complicated than that. Museums disappear for many reasons, from changing ideas about what’s worth saving to the devastation of war. Museum collections disappear: deaccessioned, traded away, repatriated, lost to changing interests and the ravages of time.

We are interested in this process of decline and decay, the taphonomy of institutions and collections, as a way of shedding light not only on the history of museums and libraries, but also on the ways in which material things reflect and shape the practices of science and the humanities, and also to help museums think about current and future practices of collections and collections use.

We invite presentations from historians, curators, registrars, and collections managers, as well as from artists and activists, on topics including:

  • Histories of museums and types of museums: We welcome case studies of museums and categories of museums that are no more. What can we learn from museums that are no more? Cast museums, commercial museums, and dime museums have mostly disappeared. Cabinets of curiosity went out of and back into fashion. Why? What is their legacy?
  • Artifacts: How do specimens degrade? How have museums come to think of permanence and ephemerality? How do museums use, and “use up” collections, either for research (e.g., destructive sampling), or for education and display; how have they thought about the balance of preservation and use? How can they collect the ephemeral?
  • Museum collection history: How long does art and artifact really remain in the museum? Might the analysis of museum databases cast new light on the long-term history and use of collections?
  • “Lost and found” in the museum: How are art and artifacts “rediscovered” in museums? How do old collections regain their importance, both in artistic revivals and in new practices of “mining” the museum as artists finding new uses for old objects?
  • Museum collections policy: How have ideas about deaccessioning changed? How should they change? How do new laws, policies, and ethics about the repatriation of collections shape ideas about collections?
  • Museums going out of business: When a museum needs to close for financial or other reasons, what’s the best way to do that? Are there good case studies and legal and financial models?
  • The future of museum collections: How might museums think about collecting the ephemeral, or collecting for “impermanent” collections. What new strategies should museums consider for short-term collecting? How might digitization and scanning shape ideas about the permanence of collections?

Papers from the Colloquium may be published as a special issue of the Museum History Journal.

Proposal Deadline: September 15, 2014

Please send an abstract of about 250 words and a brief CV to Steven Lubar, lubar@brown.edu. 

See the conference website for more details. 

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CFP: World Ethical Apparel Roundtable (WEAR) 2014

Fashion Takes Action presents: World Ethical Apparel Roundtable (WEAR) 2014
“Creating Shared Value” Comparing Canadian Experiences With International Benchmarks

November, 2014

Evergreen Brick Works, Toronto

The first conference of its kind in Canada, WEAR will bring together apparel brands and retailers, sustainability experts, NGOs and academia to share best practices, build relationships, present new research and tackle the social and environmental challenges facing the industry today.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Profitability: the profitability case for sustainable and ethical fashion
  • Social Responsibility: make fair/buy fair, navigating corporate social responsibility
  • Environmental: incorporating sustainability into the design and manufacturing process, the need and effectiveness of standards
  • Engagement: consumer perceptions, green washing and transparency

You are cordially invited to submit a presentation proposal or research abstract relevant to our overall theme or specifically referencing one of our topic areas.

Proposals should be submitted by email by no later then August 4th, 2014.

Please format using Times New Roman, font size 12, no longer then one page, and be sure to include contact information for the presenter.

Email submissions to tarah@fashiontakesaction.com.

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CFP: Brazilian Fashion Special Issue

Brazilian Fashion: A special issue of Fashion Theory – the journal of dress, body and culture 

Publication date: April 2016 (Issue 20.2)

Guest editors: Rita M. Andrade (Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil) and Regina A. Root (The College of William and Mary, USA)

Despite its popularity around the globe, the richness and complexity of Brazilian fashion remains relatively unstudied by scholars of fashion history and theory. This call for papers seeks contributions on the diverse influences and cultural construction of Brazilian fashion that surpasses any single notion of Brazilianness: its diverse styles, its postcolonial issues and avant-garde possibilities, its ethical concerns and challenges, its relationship to time and space. Integrating Brazilian fashion into a larger narrative on global trends, this volume will prioritize essays that detail history and analyze design creation and consumption, cultural references found in museum collections and archives, interactions with popular and visual culture, and projections for the future.

Submission Guidelines

Proposal due date: August 1, 2014.

Proposals should include:

  • Title
  • 300- word abstract
  • Brief bibliography (that provides a glimpse into both the subject of study and the theoretical framework)
  • 50-word biography
  • Contact information

Email: ritaandrade@hotmail.com and raroot@wm.edu. We will accept preliminary abstracts in Spanish and Portuguese with the final essay written in English. Completed essays will be due no later than March 30, 2015.

Please see the Fashion Theory website for more information.

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CFP: Pretty In Kink – Culture, Theory, Sex, Kink

This collection will focus on the many ways in which various sexual practices are framed, represented, and commodified as aberrant, transgressive, or non-normative in popular culture. Embracing a fluid and dynamic definition of the term “kink” as sharing a continuum with “normal” sexual behavior, this collection of 15-20 chapters will explore the intersection of sexuality, cultural norms, and power through focused examination of popular representations of and discourses surrounding kink.

Chapters are sought  from scholars who study, encounter, and/or teach artifacts, texts, and issues related to kink, from fields including (but not limited to) gender/queer studies, film and media studies, literature, performance studies, sociology, fashion and design, and cultural history. Possible essay/chapter topics might include, but are not limited to:

- Kink throughout history: Victorian erotica, “medical” literature, stag films.
- The “mainstreaming” of kink – fashion and advertising.
- The historical relationship between kink and queerness/homosexuality
- Kink and leather: representations of dominance and submission
- Kink and representations of trans culture and bodies
- The sideshow: watching kink/voyeurism
- Kink and public/private performance of sex (orgies, parties, swinging, webcast/amateur porn, etc)
- Kink and feminism: demonization and sex-shaming trends
- Kink and sex work: “professional” kink
- Representations of kink, pain and “extreme” lifestyles
- Kink and legal issues (secrecy, surveillance, blackmail, etc.)
- Kink and trends in mainstream and alternative pornography
- Kink in popular/alternative music
- Kink and race/nationality/ethnicity/religion
- Kink in the classroom: the pedagogy of kink

Please submit proposals of approximately 500 words to kinkandpopculture@gmail.com.

Initial deadline to meet first publishing proposal is July 15, 2014.

Please include a brief c.v. or bio which includes information about relevant research, experience, or previous publications. We welcome submissions from independent and early career scholars or others with specific related experience or expertise.

Proposals that approach the study of human sexuality from a variety of methodologies are encouraged, particularly those that are sex-positive and approach the study of this subject from a critical but non-judgmental perspective.

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CFP: The International Thread: Lace and Commerce in Eighteenth-Century Europe

“The International Thread: Lace and Commerce in Eighteenth-Century Europe”: Panel at the ISECS Quadrennial Congress on the Enlightenment

July 27-31, 2015

Rotterdam, the Netherlands

Chairs: Tara Zanardi (Department of Art & Art History, Hunter College/CUNY 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065; tzanardi@hunter.cuny.edu), and Michael Yonan (Department of Art History and Archaeology, University of Missouri, 21 Parker Hall, Columbia, MO, 65211; yonanm@missouri.edu)

Enormous amounts of lace flooded the marketplaces of eighteenth-century Europe, which fostered a vibrant international trade.  This marketplace centered on competition between the Low Countries (especially the regions that now comprise Belgium) and northern France, two areas that included Europe’s most technically accomplished lacemaking centers, including Alençon, Argentan, Brussels, Mechlin, and Valenciennes. These towns exported huge quantities of lace to an international clientele and competed with locally manufactured lace. Our panel seeks papers that examine how lace operated within eighteenth-century mercantile networks, economic systems, and black markets. What were the trade factors the affected the distribution of lace, both locally and globally, and how did those factors affect working conditions, design choices, and the objects created?   How did these market conditions affect what lace was used for, be it garments, decorative items, or household textiles?  Topics might include:

  • Treatments of lace and lace making in gendered terms
  • Lace and lace making as statements of regional or national pride
  • Labor practices in lacemaking
  • Techniques and materials
  • The industry’s global ambitions

Interdisciplinary papers are especially welcome. 

Submissions should be sent to both chairs by  June 15, 2014.

For more information, visit the congress websites:

http://www.openingmarkets.eu/

http://isecs2015.wordpress.com/

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